Undefined

BAHRAIN : Disturbing Wave of Prosecutions on Eve of National Dialogue

Reporters Without Borders accuses the authorities of continuing to crack down on journalists and media freedom in violation of the spirit for the national dialogue that King Hamad Ben Issa Al-Khalifa wants to begin tomorrow with the aim of relaunching political reforms after the unrest that began last March and the ensuing repression. Journalists and media are still being prosecuted before military courts, although the state of emergency was lifted on 1 June. The authorities are also maintaining strict control over the circulation of news and information and are pumping out propaganda aimed at both Bahraini and foreign media.

Prototype Global Disability Rights Library Launches

Human rights and disability rights advocates around the globe can now access a newly launched tool for finding the knowledge and toolkits they need: the Global Disability Rights Library (GDRL) at http://gdrl.org. A prototype "test" version of this library is being made available both on-line and off-line so that users can share feedback with the GDRL team on improving the library.

ANHRI condemns kidnapping The Yemeni journalist Yahia Al- Thanaya

CAIRO, June 21, 2011

ANHRI condemned today kidnapping The Yemeni journalist Yahia Al- Thanaya, Correspondent of " Al-Sahwa net" by a checkpoint. that was after days of his discovering to an air-force base close to San'a changed into a detention that citizens are being detained there arbitrarily, where also has a secret cells they capture them under an anonymous fate.

Bahrain - One blogger sentenced to life imprisonment, another to 15 years in jail

Reporters Without Borders is shocked by the long jail sentences that a military court passed today on 21 activists accused of belonging to terrorist organizations and trying to overthrow the government. Eight of them, including human rights activist and blogger Abduljalil Al-Singace, got life sentences. Thirteen others received sentences ranging from two to 15 years in prison. Ali Abdulemam, a blogger who was tried in absentia, was given 15 years.

Pages